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Summer Tiny Home Idea – Super Simple Design

Cabins 18 hours ago

summer tiny home

Here’s a DIY tiny house unlike any you might have seen before. These fellows did it with just a bit of lumber and that piece of corrugated metal. Interested in trying something like this yourself?

They’re a couple of Californians, named Matt & Margo, and they built this one over a dry creek bed (usually dry, anyway).

It’s their summer cottage, and it’s located, for those interested, in the western foothills of Sierra Nevada Range, California.

They also mentioned that a tiny house like this, set up as a summer house in an out-of-the-way location in an area with a significant amount of fires, like those California mountains, is one that isn’t relatively that big an investment, and if it ever were to burn up in a wildfire, they could just rebuild it.

Nice little deck, and you probably noticed that sheet of corrugated metal is quite small, and they made do by using it like a single-pitch roof, with a bit of a slant to the rest of the building.

8178 total views, 7009 today

Prefabs: A Long-Held Alternative

Prefab February 24, 2017

Prefabrication homes, or prefabs, have been an alternative style of living to building a home made with conventional construction, for years. They are by far cheaper to create and assemble than the usual home. They come in many different styles and can be customized to suit the buyers.

Prefabs are constructed in factories off the home site and then panels are assembled like puzzle pieces on-site. Less labor is necessary to put these houses together, and some prefabs can be built in as little as three days. And you can be expected to pay between $180-$220 per square foot. Prefabs are more energy efficient and can be put up just about anywhere.

Designers of prefabs having been pushing the boundaries of prefab construction.

You can live with all the convenience and comfort of conventional construction in large or small prefabs.

Some of the materials used in prefabricated houses are:
Structural steel and metal fabrications
Blockboard,plywood, laminates
Electrical and pipe fittings
MGO and gypsum board
Scaffoldings
Roofing sheets
Clear and tinted glass

The versatility of prefab houses makes them very desirable. Most of them can be moved to a location of your choice after first settling in to one place.

Prefabs are sustainable, energy friendly, produce less waste, cost less, and can be assembled anywhere you wish in days. They are a wonderful way to have the home of your dreams more easily and efficiently. Just do your research and know the right questions to ask. Images: Inhabitat, Methodhomes, and Modular Homeowners. You can find them in our directory of prefab home builders.

1595 total views, 694 today

The Tiny House Revolution: Downsizing Your Lifestyle

Tiny House February 15, 2017

Many people are finally letting go of what we sometimes call “The American Dream”: A marriage, two and a half kids, a dog, a good paying job, and a nice big house. And the accumulation of “stuff” has been at the forefront of this myth. For these folks a more minimal, manageable life holds a big attraction. Enter the tiny house.

Once the province of the retired, like RV living, more and more Americans are opting for the tiny life. Many of these tiny houses are built to be mobile so that its inhabitants can visit places of interest, and live on the road. For those of you who work and can do so remotely, but still wish to downsize your living space, the tiny house is an ideal option.

Lots of people take it on themselves to get their hands dirty and build their own tiny houses. An Alliance of professional builders promoted the use of ethical building practices and guidelines and this was carried on by the American Tiny House Association, which deals with issues of zoning and coding.

Tiny houses can be as small as 120 square feet and as large as 500 square feet, and still be considered a tiny house.

Benefits of Tiny House Living

You can divest yourself of unused and useless “stuff”. There are so many things humans can really do without – you’d be amazed at how much clutter we can get rid of and still be happy.

The cost of living in a tiny house is much more reasonable than living in a large house. Utilities are all less, and you spend much less time cleaning and maintaining your tiny house. And buying or building your own tiny house costs but a fraction of what living large does. You no longer need to live paycheck to paycheck with an exorbitant mortgage.

Tiny living forces you to be organized with the things you choose to keep in your tiny house, and therefore is more efficient.

For those who wish to “live green” the tiny house is just the ticket. You can use water collection tanks, wind turbines, and solar energy to power your tiny house and in the long run save thousands of dollars in electrical bills.

Self-sufficiency is another big reason that people opt for the tiny house. Especially if your tiny house is mobile, you can pick up and go whenever you please.

Many cities across the country are providing zoning regulations for tiny house communities, and you can actually live tiiny in a real neighborhood.

The above photograph is a wonderful example of how you can compact your life and still have all the comforts of home.

Living the tiny house lifestyle isn’t for everyone, but if you are ready for letting go of the “I need my stuff” syndrome, it may be just the thing for you.

Sources: 3 Tiny Houses That Let You Live Green-And Off The Grid, What is the Tiny House Movement?

Photo credits: Benjamin Chin, Google Images

3293 total views, 38 today

These Quonset Inexpensive Kit Homes Start at Less than $8,000

Metal Buildings February 1, 2017

How many of you have looked into these Quonset building kit homes First thing you might notice is that there are a couple of standard types, based mostly on the roof. These are P and S styles. According to SteelMaster, Quonset homes are becoming more and more popular with the DIY crowd; they can be erected quickly and provide a solid, secure, long lasting solution for most housing needs. Quonset buildings were originally developed as a sturdy answer to extreme weather conditions, and are manufactured in two styles best suited for residential applications The P Model is the style most commonly seen in use as a garage, workshop or for Quonset Hut homes. It's straight walls and pitched roof present a more traditional look than other Quonset huts

How many of you have looked into these Quonset building kit homes? First thing you might notice is that there are a couple of standard types, based mostly on the roof. These are P and S styles. According to SteelMaster,

“Quonset homes are becoming more and more popular with the DIY crowd; they can be erected quickly and provide a solid, secure, long lasting solution for most housing needs. Quonset buildings were originally developed as a sturdy answer to extreme weather conditions, and are manufactured in two styles best suited for residential applications:

“The “P” Model is the style most commonly seen in use as a garage, workshop or for Quonset Hut homes. It’s straight walls and pitched roof present a more traditional look than other Quonset huts such as the typical cylindrical Q-Model style building.

“The “S” Model has a domed roof with straight sidewalls. This is a stronger design than the “P” model, and an excellent choice for use as a barn or workshop in areas with heavy wind and snow.

“Both P & S Models are ideally suited to residential homes as they have straight sides resulting in the maximum amount of livable space. Both can easily be tailored to your aesthetic requirements with custom end walls. These can be made of steel, hardy board or even finished with stucco or brick. It is also important to note that the buildings can be insulated and that a mezzanine-type second floor can be added to larger buildings over 30 feet in width. End walls can also be fitted with windows and the roof structure can easily be fitted with skylight panels for additional natural light.”

One thing about this building style is that it is easy to set up, and another point is that it is inexpensive. We priced out the residential models, and didn’t even pick the smallest possible size. We picked a 20X40, 10 foot high unit (they go lower and higher is size and cost), and the estimate was $8,000. So they start at less than that, even for residential ones. We also priced out a smaller one for garage purposing, and the estimate was $1,200. Of course, you do have to think about other building costs, such as transportation, laying foundation, and other costs. Anyway, we’ve included photos of a variety of completed SteelMaster ones in the gallery you can check out (link below), from little plain garage-style ones to elaborate multi-floor houses.

One of the biggest companies for these Quonset style homes is SteelMaster. I recently saw a couple who had built a 40X40 home with their product, an S model, made from 22-gauge Galvalume steel, with an 18-foot peak at the center, and they spend less than $35,000 on the building, they said. And the SteelMaster metal home materials were guaranteed for 30 years (so long as the building was secured to the earth).

To see our gallery of Quonset style homes and more info about them, click here. You can also click to expand the featured image at the top of this page — all the pictures on our website expand.

142806 total views, 3163 today

IKEA’s Better Shelter Wins Design of the Year 2016

Prefab January 30, 2017

IKEA Better Shelter flat pack house

Just an update on IKEA’s prefab venture, which we covered in detail a while ago. The flat-pack shipped tiny house has now won a big design award: the Beazley Design of the Year 2016.

The flat-pack IKEA “Better Shelter,” as it’s called, is mainly a refugee housing solution in conception, but many people are now thinking about it as a possible tiny house option. Certainly, it’s very portable and ship-able, and very inexpensive (read about that here).

The award it won was for the project that best meets the criteria of design that “promotes or delivers change,” “captures the spirit of the year,” “enables access,” and “work that has extended design practice.”

There are other architecture categories as well involved in the awards, but the IKEA “Better Shelter” beat out Digital, Fashion, Graphics, Product and Transport, for the top honor of Design of the Year.

“Innovative, humanitarian and implemented, Better Shelter has everything that a Beazley Design of the Year should have,” stated on of the judges, Dr. Jana Scholze of Kingston University.

IKEA flat packThis IKEA flat pack house was originally developed in 2013 and has taken some big volume orders from the UN. Those who worked on it include: Johan Karlsson, Dennis Kanter, Christian Gustafsson, John van Leer, Tim de Haas, Nicolò Barlera, UNHCR.

To date, almost 65 million of these IKEA flatpack homes have been distributed around the globe.

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A New Type of Building Style: Flatpack Homes

Prehab Home January 23, 2017

Flatpack Homes

We’ve talked a lot about prefab homes, and they have their strengths to be sure, but now people are also talking about another building style called “flatpack homes.” They’re kit homes — actually they’re considered a type of modular home — that come flat in a box (or without a box), and then they’re set up.

This one here is one built by a company who knows cold temperature. Their flatpack modular home is Scandinavian in design and thought. It’s called the “Next House” and it’s out of Stockholm. According to the company:

“Next House is a Stockholm based company, active in architecture and construction industries, with a clear and simple vision: creating and delivering beautiful designed homes created by award winning architects.

“Next House was started on the basis that there is a need for a well constructed, elegant and functional designed home at a reasonable price. Our goal is to harmonize Swedish leading building know-how with optimal timing and low impact to the environment.

“Since Sweden is one of the premier low-impact countries in the world, Next House has followed a long tradition of environmentally friendly thinking. An important issue when putting the resources of the planet in focus is how to use energy responsibly.

“Regardless of whether you use energy to heat up or cool down your house you will use less if you house is compact. Next House models have a maximum net need of energy less than 75 kWh/m3, in Sweden this is classified as a low-energy- house.”

Their model homes start with a cabin of 15 sqm to a villa of 400 sqm. Their modular wood construction technology provides our customers with multitude of living area options.

The small XXS Next House is 150 sq. ft. with kitchen. Cost: $21,500 (you assemble).  The Large Next House is just 148 square meters (approximately 1,500 square feet).

Check out the gallery of photos below (all images on our site are expandable, even the featured image at the top).

Find more from Next House, and other farmhouse builders we’ve indexed in our Home Designers and Builders Directory. You can search the company’s name and look builders near your area. And to see more modular homes, click here.

 

6520 total views, 57 today

Never Seen a House Built Like this Unique Vacation House in the Middle of Nature

Houses January 3, 2017

Never Seen a House Built Like this Unique Vacation House in the Middle of Nature

You have to see this house! We can all learn something from this unique mastery of simplicity when it comes to building.

This vacation house, set in the middle of nature, is an attractive design in a nice setting, but there’s something else to it. While on this site we’ve featured a number of prefab homes, tiny houses, modular construction projects, metal building home options, and a ton of other things, I’ve never seen a building style like this. I’m interested.

We’re always seeking for simple building styles, because that’s part of our ‘mission’ on the site — to try to find enough options for everybody to find something that suits them and move towards a goal where everybody has their own home, whether a prefab, modular, tiny house, house boat, park model, cabin, house on wheels, whatever. So check out this building style.

It’s a building called the “Rio Bonito” and it’s by architect Carla Juacaba (of Brazil). She’s simply constructed two stone walls (although in my conception of making this simple I’m picturing cinder blocks or even concrete perhaps). Then she’s embedded the flat metal frame of the floor and ceiling into these two walls.

This sets the house up off the ground. Then she’s just slid stairs in front of the patio that is part of the entire floor.

There’s also a stone stairway on one of the walls, which leads the “cabin” (can you call it that?) up onto the roof.

She set a few walls in the center of the building to have a private bathroom, and for walls she just glazed them with large glass panels / sliding doors.

Heat? She left part of the stone wall hallow, so it can serve as a fireplace. It has a grate in front of it. The decor is minimalist. It has lights, but I suspect the kitchen stove might be wood burning, set in an adobe or other clay constructed cooking “desk”. There’s also a propane-style cookstove set up there.

For floors, she used plain long wooden floor boards with a shiny finish.

The furniture is minimal.

While this construction is an example of how simplicity can lend itself to style, you can tell this project was undertaken by a real stylish architect because of how she harmonized the shapes and sizes, the various materials, and even the colors (look at the colors of the patio, for example). What do you think?

As for lights, they have some set up. I’m not sure whether they power these with solar panels or a generator or what. I’m not sure how they get water to the cabin, either, for showers and cooking / washing. There are off-the-grid options for these things though that could be implemented.

These images and the one above are big, so they’ll look best on a large computer screen. They might also take a minute to load.For more work by Carla Juacaba, find her in our directory, where you can also find a bunch of other listings depending on your style interests, from prefabs to tiny homes. You can also check out some cabins here, tiny homes here, prefabs here, and metal buildings elsewhere on our site.

These images are big, so they'll look best on a large computer screen. They might also take a minute to load. These images are big, so they'll look best on a large computer screen. They might also take a minute to load.

5703 total views, 7 today

This Metal Home Ranch House is Amazing, but the Real Star is the Interior

Metal Buildings December 30, 2016

This Metal Home Ranch House is Amazing, but the Real Star is the Interior

Many people think about having a house out on a farm, and some of us already live out on farms and ranches or large pieces of land. Barn houses and metal homes both are seeing something of a surge of interest lately. Metal homes as an alternative building method that allows for inexpensive, strong and durable buildings that can also be reused, recycled or modified later on, and barn homes are a traditional style of building people are liking for their own homes.

Here we have a combination of both, and not only that, they added wood and stone work to create a livable space that might catch some eyes. The metal barn home here is designed and built by a company we’ve featured a number of times here on our site: Morton metal buildings — they do a number of different building types. And the job they’ve carried off here is one that I think will catch a lot of attention: a traditional rustic-style farm house that combines residential with equestrian areas.

You can see from the photo above and those below (all the photos on our website expand when you click them) that the interior of this metal building home is also a comfortable, traditional style. You can see that they’ve covered most of the building in wood cladding and some of it in stone work, including that outdoor seating area in the photo. But looking at the interior shots, I think a lot of you might agree that the interior work on this ranch house metal home is the real star of this construction project.

Some more information about this metal building:

Project Number: B066037669

Location: Pringle, SD
Dimensions: 46’W x 12’H x 105’L
This home/stall barn was built for Kerry & Dr. Lew in Pringle, SD

Special Features:
Morton’s Hi-Rib Steel
Cupolas
Wood Siding
Diamond ‘M’ Sliding Doors
Loft Door
Morton’s Energy Performer Insulation Package

Find more from Morton steel buildings, and the metal and steel design and build companies we’ve indexed in our Home Designers and Builders Directory. You can search the company’s name and look builders near your area. And to see more metal homes, click here.

This Metal Home Ranch House is Amazing, but the Real Star is the Interior

4825 total views, 22 today

Now This Is a Barn House, and It’s a Metal Building

Metal Buildings December 30, 2016

Now This Is a Barn House, and It's a Metal Building

Barn houses and metal homes both are seeing something of a surge of interest lately. Metal homes as an alternative building method that allows for inexpensive, strong and durable buildings that can also be reused, recycled or modified later on, and barn homes are a traditional style of building people are liking for their own homes.

Here we have a combination of both. The metal barn home here is designed and built by a company we’ve featured a number of times here on our site: Morton metal buildings — they do a number of different building types. And the job they’ve carried off here is one that I think will catch a lot of attention: a totally white-clad farm house that combines residential with equestrian areas, under a pale grey shingled roof.

You can see from the photo above and those below (all the photos on our website expand when you click them) that the interior of this metal building home is also a comfortable, traditional style.

Some more information about this metal building:

Project Number: B091005395
Location: Oconomowoc, WI
Dimensions: 42’W x 14’H x 60’L
This horse barn was built for Kari & Stu of Oconomowoc, WI

Special Features:
– Morton’s Hi-Rib Steel
– Shingled Roof
– Cupola
– Dormers
– Porch
– Morton’s Energy Performer Insulation Package

Find more from Morton steel buildings, and the metal and steel design and build companies we’ve indexed in our Home Designers and Builders Directory. You can search the company’s name and look builders near your area. And to see more metal homes, click here.

Now This Is a Barn House, and It's a Metal Building

6151 total views, 68 today

Prefabs houses are one thing, but would you live in a cardboard house?

Prefab December 16, 2016

Cardboard House

So you may be familiar with prefabs made of wood, stone, metal, bricks — we have a number of those covered on this websites — and even foam prefab and modular houses, but now in the everexpanding market of home building materials: cardboard.

The idea here is that a Dutch house designer thought up cardboard houses when he found himself throwing away a lot of cardboard packing tubes, and he thought why not make something out of them. Now, people have been making furniture out of cardboard and other products, like Google’s Cardboard project, but he made a prefab house.

“The fact is that the more you explore cardboard, the more benefits it offers,” according to designer Maarten Heijltjes of Waarmakers. “It solves two of the main problems in building – it is structural and insulating at the same time, while also being light enough to transport inexpensively. Sure, when people hear of a cardboard house, inevitably there’s some scepticism. But it’s a question of perception. Tell them that it’s a house made of wood, but that we’re just using wood fibre in a far more efficient way, and they start to see it makes sense.”

How it works: many layers of cardboard are stacked to make modular panels. Then they mold these modular panels around a house frame.

“First, they make 1.2-metre-deep segments, or modules, constructed from 24 layers of waterproofed, recycled cardboard moulded around a house-shaped frame,” according to 1843 Magazine. “These are then fixed together to make the finished building. Thanks to this system of pre-made sections, each house – starting at around €25,000 and available with elegant plywood interiors, glass doors and even wood burners – can be put together in as little as a single day.” They’re also very light for transportation to a building site.

The interiors are plywood. They add glass doors and wood stoves.

Construction time: 1 day at minimum. Sold so far: 8. They’ve received as many orders for more. They expect the prefab modular houses to last up to 100 years. Cost: right now around 25K Euros (26K U.S.).

“Actually, when you look at it, cardboard is beautiful,” said Heijltjes. “It has a texture and warmth to it.”

Read more about Wicklehouse in our directory of prefab homes.

cardboard house Cardboard House

11357 total views, 36 today

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  • How many of you have looked into these Quonset building kit homes First thing you might notice is that there are a couple of standard types, based mostly on the roof. These are P and S styles. According to SteelMaster, Quonset homes are becoming more and more popular with the DIY crowd; they can be erected quickly and provide a solid, secure, long lasting solution for most housing needs. Quonset buildings were originally developed as a sturdy answer to extreme weather conditions, and are manufactured in two styles best suited for residential applications The P Model is the style most commonly seen in use as a garage, workshop or for Quonset Hut homes. It's straight walls and pitched roof present a more traditional look than other Quonset huts

    These Quonset Inexpensive Kit Homes Start at Less than $8,000

    by on February 1, 2017 - 0 Comments

    How many of you have looked into these Quonset building kit homes? First thing you might notice is that there are a couple of standard types, based mostly on the roof. These are P and S styles. According to SteelMaster, “Quonset homes are becoming more and more popular with the DIY crowd; they can be […]

  • How about a Metal House Ranch Home

    How About A Metal House Ranch Home?

    by on December 2, 2016 - 0 Comments

    This is quite the building and quite the setting, too. In a wide open piece of green farmland sits this newly built traditional style metal barn house. Metal homes as an alternative building method that allows for inexpensive, strong and durable buildings that can also be reused, recycled or modified later on, and barn homes […]

  • Cardboard House

    Prefabs houses are one thing, but would you live in a cardboard house?

    by on December 16, 2016 - 0 Comments

    So you may be familiar with prefabs made of wood, stone, metal, bricks — we have a number of those covered on this websites — and even foam prefab and modular houses, but now in the everexpanding market of home building materials: cardboard. The idea here is that a Dutch house designer thought up cardboard […]

  • summer tiny home

    Summer Tiny Home Idea - Super Simple Design

    by on 18 hours ago - 0 Comments

    Here’s a DIY tiny house unlike any you might have seen before. These fellows did it with just a bit of lumber and that piece of corrugated metal. Interested in trying something like this yourself? They’re a couple of Californians, named Matt & Margo, and they built this one over a dry creek bed (usually dry, anyway). […]

  • Flatpack Homes

    A New Type of Building Style: Flatpack Homes

    by on January 23, 2017 - 0 Comments

    We’ve talked a lot about prefab homes, and they have their strengths to be sure, but now people are also talking about another building style called “flatpack homes.” They’re kit homes — actually they’re considered a type of modular home — that come flat in a box (or without a box), and then they’re set […]